SWEATING THE INTERVIEW: Excessive Sweaters need not apply?

If success is 1% inspiration and 99% perspiration, then it might follow that the hyperhidrosis sufferer should have no trouble gaining employment. Not so fast! According to an  International Hyperhidrosis Society (IHHS) employment survey of people dealing with issues of excessive sweating, the condition, also known as hyperhidrosis, can deter potential employers from hiring otherwise capable candidates and even deter those afflicted from seeking employment altogether.

"It comes as no surprise that our survey has confirmed the debilitating effect of hyperhidrosis on employment," says Dr. David Pariser, former president of the American Academy of Dermatology and founding board member of IHHS. "In today's tough economy, job seekers need every possible edge to make a good first impression on potential employers. Unfortunately, excessive sweating disorder is often misinterpreted as a lack of confidence, negatively influencing chances of being selected as a job candidate."

Conducted by the International Hyperhidrosis Society, the survey reveals the impact of the sweat condition on job interviews and career choices. The findings are dramatic, especially among those living with the affliction. The survey numbers clearly show the personal and professional toll experienced by individuals with hyperhidrosis. Because of concerns about excessive underarm sweat;

• 86% of those surveyed say they are fearful of going on job interviews,

• 27% avoid job interviews altogether,

• 88% say they avoid professions which are likely to reveal their ailment,

• 67% avoid speaking in public while in a professional setting, and

• More than half (56%) have had to avoid giving a presentation due to excessive underarm sweat.

The survey's most shocking finding is that nearly 1-in-4 adults (24%) don't know that chronic excessive sweating is a treatable medical disorder. The social stigma and lack of understanding about this life-altering condition, even by those who live with it, is especially tragic when help and hope are attainable.

Human resources consultant and transformational life coach Suzanne Eder is a strong proponent of job seekers utilizing all means of assistance to become advocates for their personal success and happiness. "The most essential element required to develop a deeply satisfying career is maintaining a state of inner peace and confidence. Without that strong foundation, self-doubt can erode the creative potential of even the most qualified person for a given opportunity. I would strongly encourage anyone dealing with the challenges of hyperhidrosis to reach out for the support and treatment they need and deserve."

The International Hyperhidrosis Society website (www.SweatHelp.org) provides education, support and medical resources to an estimated 176+ million affected children, teens and adults worldwide. Translated into multiple languages; visitors to the site soon discover that a network of support systems exist, that a variety of treatment programs are largely covered by insurance, and that there is a resource leader to turn to for answers to every question there is about the disorder. The site's hyperhidrosis Physician Finder database helps individuals locate doctors worldwide. The finder focuses on physicians that are familiar with hyperhidrosis and trained by the IHHS on treatment methods.

Hyperhidrosis is a treatable medical condition that results in sweating that exceeds the normal amount required to maintain consistent body temperature – up to five times the average volume. This excessive sweating occurs regardless of environmental surroundings – people with hyperhidrosis sweat profusely nearly all day, every day. Primary hyperhidrosis can affect one or more body areas, most often the palms, armpits, soles of the feet or face and sometimes the groin and under the breasts in men and women. Secondary hyperhidrosis, on the other hand, is generalized, typically involving the whole body.

Patients with severe sweating should seek medical advice from dermatologists who can provide diagnosis and treatments, often covered by insurance, ranging from prescription-strength anti-perspirants to BOTOX®.

The International Hyperhidrosis Society Survey on Excessive Underarm Sweating and its Impact on Adults in the Workplace queried a nationwide sample of 2,068 U.S. adults aged 18 years and older. The survey also includes an additional study of 233 U.S. adults aged 18 years and older, all diagnosed with hyperhidrosis.

The International Hyperhidrosis Society is committed to reducing the symptoms, anxiety and social stigma associated with excessive sweating by offering education, support and medical resources to 176+ million affected children, teens and adults worldwide. The IHHS supports hyperhidrosis research, educates healthcare professionals in optimal diagnosis and care, raises awareness about the condition's emotional and economic impacts, and advocates for patient access to effective treatments while increasing public understanding of this debilitating medical condition.

The International Hyperhidrosis Society's Web site, www.SweatHelp.org, includes a hyperhidrosis Physician Finder to help anyone with excessive sweating to find medical help, information on excessive sweating treatment options, and a comprehensive collection of hyperhidrosis insurance and reimbursement tools, including downloadable forms, which can help sufferers work with their physicians and health insurance plans to get the correct coverage for necessary treatments. There are practical tips to make the most out of appointments with physicians, information on clinical trials and a blog that will keep everyone current on hyperhidrosis news and medical breakthroughs. And because hyperhidrosis usually starts in the teen years, the IHHS prioritizes helping teenagers learn how to cope with the condition and find effective solutions. 

International Hyperhidrosis Society® is a registered trademark of the International Hyperhidrosis Society.

BOTOX® is a registered trademark of Allergan, Inc.